Special |

John Maddox 1925-2009

It was with great sadness that Nature learned of the death on 12 April 2009 of Sir John Maddox. He first took over the reins as the editor of Nature in 1966 and served until 1973; he returned for a second stint as editor from 1980 until 1995. During his tenure, he laid the foundations for Nature as it is today, establishing a system of peer review and instituting a strong tradition of journalism. Here we present a series of tributes by his colleagues, and a selection of John Maddox's journalism covering four decades at Nature.

Tributes

John Maddox, who died on 12 April, was editor of Nature during 1966–73 and 1980–95. He transformed the journal from a collegially amateurish publication into one that was challenging and professional in its assessment of science and in its journalistic reportage.

News | | Nature

Articles by John Maddox

Reductionism is almost a dirty word, especially in biology, but after thirty years of DNA, it is high time that biologists paid attention to the question of what constitutes an explanation.

News & Views | | Nature

Attempts to calculate the properties of real materials from those of their constituents have never been outstandingly successful. New, but still empirical, techniques may help.

News & Views | | Nature

Science and technology are parts of a seamless spectrum, but there is a good reason to believe that the literature of engineering does a disservice to the professional community it purports to serve.

News & Views | | Nature

A new calculation of the polymorphs of silica appears to have broken new ground in deriving crystal structure from chemical composition. But X-ray crystallographers need not worry — yet.

News & Views | | Nature

From this issue of Nature, the past several weeks' correspondence on the Benveniste affair will be closed. The editor o/Nature here discusses some of the issues that have arisen.

News & Views | | Nature

The immediate future for science is bright, but the future may be clouded by poor public education and by too much competitiveness — the gist of a talk at Los Alamos on Tuesday.

News & Views | | Nature

Journals are bound to be concerned with and by the published products of scientific misconduct, but there must be doubts about their ability to keep a diverse profession's conscience.

News & Views | | Nature

Knees are intricate heavy-duty joints that are now, like many other parts of the body, partially replaceable. A knee surgeons' handbook now published shows what lies ahead.

News & Views | | Nature

Nature will give up monitoring the coverage of AIDS by the Sunday Times in the hope that the wind has changed.

Opinion | | Nature