Collection |

Improving reproducibility in animal research

There have been increasingly lively discussions about many published scientific results failing validation by independent studies. This so-called reproducibility crisis has led to criticisms of study design in animal research. Inappropriate statistical methods, poor experimental design, and extreme standardization in trial design may contribute to the problem. This Collection presents original methodologies to improve the status quo and to report meta-research about the reproducibility of published animal research.

Submissions are welcome on a rolling basis. Find out how to submit on this page.

All articles have undergone Scientific Reports' standard peer review process and have been subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. This includes the journal’s policy on competing interests. The Guest Editor declares no competing interests with the submissions which they have handled through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Guest Editor has competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.
This Collection has not been supported by sponsorship.

Editorial

There have been increasingly lively discussions about many published scientific results failing validation by independent studies. This so-called reproducibility crisis has led to particularly strong criticism of methodological weaknesses in animal research. Inappropriate statistical methods, poor experimental design, and extreme standardization in trial design are some contributing factors to the problem. The purpose of this Collection is to present original methodologies to improve the status quo and additionally to report meta-research about the reproducibility of published animal research.

Editorial | Open Access | | Scientific Reports

Articles