PAIN

Sex differences in learned conditioned pain sensitivity

Subjects

A unique paradigm to investigate the intersection between memory, pain, and stress reveals new details about the processes that underlie pain memory. In both mice and men, males seem more susceptible.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Fig. 1: Schematic of Martin et al’s mouse-conditioning paradigm.

References

  1. 1.

    Merskey, H. & Bogduk N. Classification of chronic pain. Part III: Pain terms, a current list with definitions and notes on usage. 2nd Edition, IASP task force on taxonomy. IASP Press, 209–214 (1994).

  2. 2.

    Price, T. J. & Inyang, K. E. Prog. Mol. Biol. Transl. Sci. 131, 409–434 (2015).

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. 3.

    Martin, L.J. et al. Curr. Biol. 29, 192–201 (2019).

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  4. 4.

    Mogil, J. S. Nature reviews. Neuroscience 13, 859–866 (2012).

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  5. 5.

    Sacktor, T.C. & Hell, J.W. Sci. Signal 10 (2017).

  6. 6.

    Price, T. J. & Ghosh, S. Molecular Pain 9, 6 (2013).

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  7. 7.

    Machida, T., Yonezawa, Y. & Noumura, T. Horm. Behav. 15, 238–245 (1981).

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Anna M. W. Taylor.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Dworsky-Fried, Z., Taylor, A.M.W. Sex differences in learned conditioned pain sensitivity. Lab Anim 48, 119–120 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41684-019-0266-1

Download citation

Search

Nature Briefing

Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.

Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing