In emergencies, health research must go beyond public engagement toward a true partnership with those affected

An Ebola virus outbreak taking place in the complex political and social context of The Democratic Republic of the Congo has forced the research community to reflect on their approach to community engagement. Katharine Wright and Michael Parker, on behalf of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics Working Group on research in global health emergencies, say that those affected need to influence research choices from the very beginning and that the value of their knowledge must be recognized.

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Correspondence to Katharine Wright.

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Wright, K., Parker, M., Bhattacharya, S. et al. In emergencies, health research must go beyond public engagement toward a true partnership with those affected. Nat Med (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0758-y

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