Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Author Correction: Defining the consequences of genetic variation on a proteome-wide scale

The Original Article was published on 15 June 2016

Correction to: Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/nature18270 Published online 15 June 2016

In this Article, the sample identifiers for two consecutive tandem mass tag (TMT) 10-plexes in the proteomics dataset were inadvertently swapped. We corrected the 18 affected sample identifiers for which we could verify their identity by comparison with the RNA-sequencing data and removed two ambiguous samples. We then re-analysed the corrected dataset and compared the protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL) and mediation results with those originally reported. We verified that every specific pQTL and mediator–target interaction highlighted in the original Article replicated successfully in the new analysis with the corrected proteomics dataset. We identify more significant local and distant pQTLs with the corrected dataset. Nearly 97% of reported local pQTLs replicate after correcting for the sample swaps, and we detect 439 additional significant local pQTLs. Distant pQTLs replicated at a much lower rate, consistent with the replication rate we estimated for distant eQTL (Extended Data Fig. 4) and those reported for other eQTL datasets of similar size1. Highly significant distant pQTL replicated at much higher rates, and every distant pQTL individually highlighted in the Article successfully replicated in the corrected dataset. Finally, correcting for the sample swaps resulted in more mediator proteins being identified for more distant pQTL. In summary, the results from our re-analysis of the corrected dataset reinforce the conclusions made in the original Article. We have updated Supplementary Tables 3, 5 and 8 (proteomics dataset, list of pQTLs and mediation results, respectively) of the original Article to reflect these corrections (see Supplementary Information to this Amendment). We regret the oversight and are grateful to B. Zhang and colleagues for bringing it to our attention. The original Article has not been corrected online.

References

  1. Strunz, T. et al. A mega-analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) provides insight into the regulatory architecture of gene expression variation in liver. Sci. Rep. 8, 5865 (2018).

    ADS  Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Gary A. Churchill or Steven P. Gygi.

Additional information

Supplementary information is available in the online version of this Amendment.

Supplementary information

Supplementary Table

This file contains the corrected Supplementary Table 3 to the original paper.

Supplementary Table

This file contains the corrected Supplementary Table 5 to the original paper.

Supplementary Table

This file contains the corrected Supplementary Table 8 to the original paper.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Chick, J.M., Munger, S.C., Simecek, P. et al. Author Correction: Defining the consequences of genetic variation on a proteome-wide scale. Nature 606, E16 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-022-04920-w

Download citation

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-022-04920-w

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Search

Quick links

Nature Briefing

Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.

Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing