Sequencing in the time of Ebola

This month’s Genome Watch highlights how next-generation sequencing technologies provide crucial information during disease outbreaks and thus inform the public health response.

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Correspondence to Sandra Van Puyvelde or Silvia Argimon.

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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Van Puyvelde, S., Argimon, S. Sequencing in the time of Ebola. Nat Rev Microbiol 17, 5 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0130-0

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