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Climate change affects multiple dimensions of well-being through impacts, information and policy responses

Abstract

The consequences of climate change and responses to climate change interact with multiple dimensions of human well-being in ways that are emerging or invisible to decision makers. We examine how elements of well-being—health, safety, place, self and belonging—are at risk from climate change. We propose that the material impacts of a changing climate, discourses and information on future and present climate risks, and policy responses to climate change affect all these elements of well-being. We review evidence on the scale and scope of these climate change consequences for well-being and propose policy and research priorities that are oriented towards supporting well-being though a changing climate.

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Fig. 1: Conceptual framework.

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Adger, W.N., Barnett, J., Heath, S. et al. Climate change affects multiple dimensions of well-being through impacts, information and policy responses. Nat Hum Behav 6, 1465–1473 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-022-01467-8

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