EPIDEMIOLOGY

Adult resilience after child abuse

Growing evidence links adverse childhood experiences to health problems decades later. A study of adults followed in midlife finds that perceived social support predicts lower subsequent mortality, particularly for adults reporting child abuse, suggesting that supportive relationships buffer long-term health in the context of early maltreatment.

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Correspondence to Ann S. Masten.

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The author declares no competing interests.

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Masten, A.S. Adult resilience after child abuse. Nat Hum Behav 2, 244–245 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-018-0319-2

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