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Turning back time with emerging rejuvenation strategies

Nature Cell Biologyvolume 21pages3243 (2019) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Ageing is associated with the functional decline of all tissues and a striking increase in many diseases. Although ageing has long been considered a one-way street, strategies to delay and potentially even reverse the ageing process have recently been developed. Here, we review four emerging rejuvenation strategies—systemic factors, metabolic manipulations, senescent cell ablation and cellular reprogramming—and discuss their mechanisms of action, cellular targets, potential trade-offs and application to human ageing.

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Acknowledgements

We apologize to those colleagues whose work we could not cite owing to space limitations. We thank C. Kenyon, P. Singh, J. Vos, M. Quarta and A. Colville for helpful feedback on the manuscript. This work was supported by the Stanford Graduate Fellowship (L.X.) and a generous philanthropic gift from M. Barakett and T. Barakett.

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Author notes

  1. These authors contributed equally: Salah Mahmoudi, Lucy Xu.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Salah Mahmoudi
    • , Lucy Xu
    •  & Anne Brunet
  2. Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Lucy Xu
  3. Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

    • Anne Brunet

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Anne Brunet.

Supplementary information

  1. Supplementary Table 1

    Extended summary of studies testing rejuvenation interventions at midlife and later in wild type mice.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/s41556-018-0206-0