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Unravelling the potential of angiogenic factors for the early prediction of preeclampsia

Abstract

Preeclampsia is a multisystem, multiorgan hypertensive disorder of pregnancy responsible for maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries. The classic diagnostic features hold less specificity for preeclampsia and its associated adverse outcomes, suggesting a need for specific and reliable biomarkers for the early prediction of preeclampsia. The imbalance of pro- and antiangiogenic circulatory factors contributes to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Several studies have examined the profile of angiogenic factors in preeclampsia to search for a biomarker that will improve the diagnostic ability of preeclampsia and associated adverse outcomes. This may help in more efficient patient management and the reduction of associated health care costs. This article reviews the findings from previous studies published to date on angiogenic factors and suggests a need to apply a multivariable model from the beginning of pregnancy and continuing throughout gestation for the early and specific prediction of preeclampsia.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) for funding the REVAMP (Research Exploring Various Aspects and Mechanisms in Preeclampsia) study (5/7/1069/13-RCH). Author AS thanks the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Government of India, for providing her the ‘RA fellowship’ (RBMH/FW/2019/17).

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Correspondence to Sadhana R. Joshi.

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Deshpande, J.S., Sundrani, D.P., Sahay, A.S. et al. Unravelling the potential of angiogenic factors for the early prediction of preeclampsia. Hypertens Res 44, 756–769 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41440-021-00647-9

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Keywords

  • Placental growth factor (PlGF)
  • Preeclampsia
  • sFlt-1 to PlGF ratio
  • Soluble endoglin (sEndoglin)
  • Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1)
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)

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