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Does my genome look big in this?

Abstract

This month's Genome Watch discusses selected recent genome papers that have examined the mechanisms and implications of reductive genome evolution.

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Figure 1: Remarkable repeat density in the Orientia tsutsugamushi genome.

References

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DATABASES

Entrez Genome Project

Borrelia duttonii

Borrelia recurrentis

Orientia tsutsugamushi

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Walker, A., Langridge, G. Does my genome look big in this?. Nat Rev Microbiol 6, 878–879 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrmicro2044

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