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The Rockefeller Foundation and the rise of molecular biology

Abstract

The Rockefeller Foundation began to support a systematic transfer of physico-chemical technology to experimental biology in the early 1930s. A close look at three key projects in the United Kingdom shows the impact and limits of private philanthropy on scientific innovation.

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Figure 1: John D. Rockefeller, Sr (1839–1937) and John D. Rockefeller, Jr (1874–1960).
Figure 2: Sir Lawrence Bragg (1890–1971).

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DATABASES

Encyclopedia of Life Sciences:

Francis Crick

James D. Watson

Max Perutz

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Rockefeller Archive Center

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Abir-Am, P. The Rockefeller Foundation and the rise of molecular biology. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 3, 65–70 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrm702

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