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Multifunctional deadenylase complexes diversify mRNA control

Abstract

Dynamic changes of the lengths of mRNA poly(A) tails are catalysed by diverse deadenylase enzymes. Modulating the length of the poly(A) tail of an mRNA is a widespread means of controlling protein production and mRNA stability. Recent insights illuminate the specialized activities, biological functions and regulation of deadenylases. We propose that the recruitment of multifunctional deadenylase complexes provides unique opportunities to control mRNAs and that the heterogeneity of the deadenylase complexes is exploited to control translation and mRNA stability.

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Figure 1: Pathways of translation and degradation.
Figure 2: Regulation of mRNA deadenylation.
Figure 3: Multifunctional control of mRNA decay and translation.

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Acknowledgements

We appreciate discussions and input from E. Lund, J. Dahlberg, J. Lykke-Andersen and members of the Wickens laboratory. We thank L. Vanderploeg for assistance with artwork. We apologize to those authors whose work we could not cite owing to space limitations.

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Correspondence to Marvin Wickens.

Supplementary information

Supplementary information S1 (table)

Deadenylase nomeclature (PDF 173 kb)

Supplementary information S2 (figure)

Deadenylase complexes (PDF 251 kb)

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Goldstrohm, A., Wickens, M. Multifunctional deadenylase complexes diversify mRNA control. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 9, 337–344 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrm2370

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