Commentary | Published:

Insuring nanotech requires effective risk communication

Nature Nanotechnology volume 12, pages 717719 (2017) | Download Citation

The absence of nanotechnology-specific insurance policies could be detrimental to the development of the nanotechnology industry. Better communication between insurers and scientists is an essential step to provide a regulatory framework protecting both producers and consumers.

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Acknowledgements

The views of T.M. and A.G. incorporated into this Commentary are their own, and do not necessarily reflect those of their employers, or represent generally held views in the insurance industry. The research leading to this Commentary has received funding from the European Community's Horizon 2020 Programme under grant agreement no. 720851, PROTECT (www.protect-h2020.eu).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Finbarr Murphy, Martin Mullins and Karena Hester are at the Kemmy Business School, University of Limerick, Ireland

    • Finbarr Murphy
    • , Martin Mullins
    •  & Karena Hester
  2. Allen Gelwick is at Lockton Companies, LLC, 5847 San Felipe, Suite 320, Houston, Texas 77057, USA

    • Allen Gelwick
  3. Janeck J. Scott-Fordsmand is in the Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Silkeborg, Denmark

    • Janeck J. Scott-Fordsmand
  4. Trevor Maynard is at the Corporation of Lloyd's, One Lime Street, London

    • Trevor Maynard

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Finbarr Murphy.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2017.162

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