Science and democracy

The future of nanotechnology depends on public acceptance, says Chris Toumey, so the nanotechnology community needs to listen to public opinion.

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Toumey, C. Science and democracy. Nature Nanotech 1, 6–7 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2006.71

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