Magnetic stimulation reveals the distribution of language in a normal population

Language is classically considered to be a function of the left side of the brain. Now an interference technique, transcranial magnetic stimulation, in healthy subjects shows that the right-side language activity detected in some people is indeed functionally relevant.

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Figure 1: TMS induces a local electric field in the surface of the brain beneath the stimulator, and thereby disrupts local brain activity released from inhibition by the dominant.

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Humphreys, G., Praamstra, P. Magnetic stimulation reveals the distribution of language in a normal population. Nat Neurosci 5, 613–614 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1038/nn0702-613

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