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Beam me up, Scottie! TREK channels swing both ways

Nature Neuroscience volume 4, pages 457458 (2001) | Download Citation

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TREK1 was known as a voltage-independent 'background' potassium channel, but a new study suggests that protein kinase A can reversibly convert it to a voltage-dependent state.

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Affiliations

  1. John Adelman is in the Vollum Institute, and James Maylie is in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Dept.,Oregon Health Sciences University, 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Rd., Portland, Oregon 97201-3098, USA. adelman@ohsu.edu

    • James Maylie
    •  & John P. Adelman

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/87402

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