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Trust in the brain

Nature Neuroscience volume 5, pages 192193 (2002) | Download Citation

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A new event-related fMRI study suggests that decisions about trustworthiness involve structures that process emotions, and raises intriguing questions about cues used for such judgments.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. The author is in the Dept. of Neurology, University of Iowa College of Medicine, 200 Hawkins Street, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA ralph-adolphs@uiowa.edu

    • Ralph Adolphs

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn0302-192

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