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The frontal cortex: does size matter?

Nature Neuroscience volume 5, pages 190192 (2002) | Download Citation

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The human frontal cortex has been reported to be proportion-ally larger than in other primates. Magnetic resonance scans of humans, apes and monkeys now cast doubt on this idea.

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Affiliations

  1. The author is in the Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD, UK. dick.passingham@psy.ox.ac.uk

    • Richard E. Passingham

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn0302-190

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