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Predicting perception from population codes

Nature Neurosciencevolume 3pages201202 (2000) | Download Citation

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Treue and colleagues use electrophysiological recordings in monkeys and psychophysical experiments in humans to suggest that the shape of a population response in a motion sensitive region of the brain (area MT), rather than the peak of the response, determines motion perception.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Psychological Brain Sciences, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, 03755, New Hampshire, USA

    • Jennifer M. Groh

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https://doi.org/10.1038/72895

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