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Back to the past in schizophrenia genomics

Nature Neuroscience volume 19, pages 12 (2016) | Download Citation

Conclusive evidence for defective neurodevelopment in schizophrenia is lacking. Two DNA methylation studies now draw a link between fetal brain epigenomes, epigenetic alterations in the adult diseased brain and genetic risk for the disease.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Andrew J. Sharp is in the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

    • Andrew J Sharp
  2. Schahram Akbarian is in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

    • Schahram Akbarian

Authors

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Andrew J Sharp or Schahram Akbarian.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.4203

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