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An axis of good and awful in odor reception

Nature Neuroscience volume 14, pages 13601362 (2011) | Download Citation

Patchy variation in odor-evoked electrical activity in the human olfactory epithelium is found to correlate with stimulus pleasantness. This finding depends on a new technique for recording directly from awake humans.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Marion E. Frank and Thomas P. Hettinger are at the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut, USA.

    • Marion E Frank
    •  & Thomas P Hettinger

Authors

  1. Search for Marion E Frank in:

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Marion E Frank.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2967

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