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Perivascular instruction of cell genesis and fate in the adult brain

Abstract

The perivascular niche for neurogenesis was first reported as the co-association of newly generated neurons and their progenitors with both dividing and mitotically quiescent endothelial cells in restricted regions of the brain in adult birds and mammals alike. This review attempts to summarize our present understanding of the interaction of blood vessels with neural stem and progenitor cells, addressing both glial and neuronal progenitor cell interactions in the perivascular niche. We review the molecular interactions that are most critical to the endothelial control of stem and progenitor cell mobilization and differentiation. The focus throughout will be on defining those perivascular ligand-receptor interactions shared among these systems, as well as those that clearly differ as a function of cell type and setting, by which specificity may be achieved in the development of targeted therapeutics.

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Figure 1: Perivascular interactions within the subgranular zone of the adult mammalian hippocampus.
Figure 2: Perivascular interactions with the adult mammalian subependyma.
Figure 3: Angiogenesis and neurogenesis in the adult songbird brain.

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Acknowledgements

We thank M. Nedergaard for her comments on the manuscript and A. Benraiss and C. McClain for designing the schematics. Work discussed in the Goldman laboratory was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (grants R37NS29813, R01NS75345 and R01NS39559) and by grants from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Charitable Foundation, the Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Medical Research Foundation, the CHDI Foundation, and the New York State Stem Cell Research Program.

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Correspondence to Steven A Goldman.

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Goldman, S., Chen, Z. Perivascular instruction of cell genesis and fate in the adult brain. Nat Neurosci 14, 1382–1389 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2963

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