News & Views | Published:

Bacterial physiology: The ties that bind

Nature Microbiology volume 1, Article number: 16192 (2016) | Download Citation

  • A Correction to this article was published on 07 November 2016

The spirochaete flagella, unlike those of other bacteria, are located entirely within the periplasm of the bacteria. New work highlights another unique spirochaete characteristic — an unusual covalent linkage that mediates flagellar hook self-polymerization and is required for motility.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nat. Microbiol. 1, 16134 (2016).

  2. 2.

    et al. PLoS ONE 9, e98338 (2014).

  3. 3.

    & J. Bacteriol. 198, 746–754 (2015).

  4. 4.

    et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1844, 1402–1414 (2014).

  5. 5.

    et al. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 7, 215–225 (2009).

  6. 6.

    et al. Biochem. Soc. Trans. 43, 787–794 (2015).

  7. 7.

    & Annu. Rev. Genet. 36, 47–73 (2002).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Gillian M. Fraser is in the Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QP, UK.

    • Gillian M. Fraser

Authors

  1. Search for Gillian M. Fraser in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Gillian M. Fraser.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.192

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing