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The route to fullerenoid oxides

Nature Materials volume 3, pages 269273 (2004) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Tetrahedral oxides, like silicates and aluminates, have attracted great interest due to their potential for numerous applications in various fields ranging from catalysis, ion exchange and molecular sieves, to thermo- and photoluminescence. In spite of their tetrahedral character, no effort has been made to date for establishing structural relationships between these tetrahedral oxides with different forms of carbon, for example, fullerenes. Here, we report for the first time an oxide that exhibits a three-dimensional framework of AlO4 tetrahedra forming huge 'Al84' spheres, similar to those of the D2d isomer of the C84 fullerenes. These Al84 spheres, displayed in a face-centred-cubic lattice, are easily identified by high-resolution electron microscopy. We also show that this Sr33Bi24+δAl48O141+3δ/2 aluminate exhibits an onion-skin-like subnanostructure of its Bi/Sr/O species located inside the Al84 spheres. The role of the original pseudo-spheric anion [Bi16O52−nn] —with n vacancies (□)—in the stabilization of such a structure is discussed. This structure seems to be promising for the generation of a large family of fullerene-type (fullerenoid) oxides with various properties.

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  1. Laboratoire CRISMAT, UMR 6508 CNRS ENSICAEN, 6 bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 CAEN Cedex 4, France

    • Maryvonne Hervieu
    • , Benjamin Mellène
    • , Richard Retoux
    • , Sophie Boudin
    •  & Bernard Raveau

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Maryvonne Hervieu.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat1089

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