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Toll-free immunity?

Nature Medicine volume 14, pages 13181319 (2008) | Download Citation

Subjects

Toll-like receptors (TLRs), molecules that recognize molecular components of microbes, have taken center stage in immunologists' view of how innate immunity is triggered. A study in people genetically deficient for MyD88, a molecule central to TLR signaling in mice, should now spur a reexamination of simple views of TLR biology, as Rino Rappuoli and his colleagues explain. Delphine J. Lee and Robert L. Modlin examine how TLR9 recognition of self DNA, instead of microbe DNA, may prompt autoimmunity.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, 45 Sidney Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA, and

    • Nicholas Valiante
    •  & Rino Rappuoli
  2. Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Via Fiorentina 1, 53100 Siena, Italy.  rino.rappuoli@novartis.com

    • Ennio De Gregorio
    •  & Rino Rappuoli

Authors

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Competing interests

The authors are full-time employees of Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1208-1318

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