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Dilated cardiomyopathy: learning to live with yourself

Nature Medicinevolume 9pages14551456 (2003) | Download Citation

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Two new studies outline the causes of dilated cardiomyopathy, an autoimmune reaction that slowly destroys the heart (pages 1477–1483 and 1484–1490).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 90095-1679, California, USA

    • W Robb MacLellan
    •  & Aldons J Lusis

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1203-1455

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