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Correlates of immune protection in HIV-1 infection: what we know, what we don't know, what we should know

Nature Medicine volume 10, pages 806810 (2004) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The field of vaccinology began in ignorance of how protection was instilled in vaccine recipients. Today, a greater knowledge of immunology allows us to better understand what is being stimulated by various vaccines that leads to their protective effects: that is, their correlates of protection. Here we describe what is known about the correlates of protection for existing vaccines against a range of different viral diseases and discuss the correlates of protection against disease during natural infection with HIV-1. We will also discuss why it is important to design phase 3 clinical trials of HIV vaccines to determine the correlates of protection for each individual vaccine.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by research grants from the Swiss National Foundation (FN 3100-058913/2) and the European Commission (QLK2-CT-1999-01321).

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  1. Giuseppe Pantaleo is in the Laboratory of AIDS Immunopathogenesis, Division of Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland. giuseppe.pantaleo@chuv.hospvd.ch

    • Giuseppe Pantaleo
  2. Richard A. Koup is in the Laboratory of Immunology, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. rkoup@mil.nih.gov

    • Richard A Koup

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm0804-806