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Young blood rejuvenates old brains

Nature Medicine volume 20, pages 582583 (2014) | Download Citation

Age-related cognitive decline occurs in many mammals, including humans, resulting from a decline in hippocampal function, and it is associated with reduced synaptic plasticity in hippocampal circuits. In this issue of Nature Medicine, a new study shows that cognitive impairment observed in aged mice is largely reversible following exposure to the blood of young mice.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Steven M. Paul is at the Appel Alzheimer's Disease Research Institute, Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA.

    • Steven M Paul
  2. Steven M. Paul and Kiran Reddy are at Third Rock Ventures, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • Steven M Paul
    •  & Kiran Reddy

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  1. Search for Steven M Paul in:

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Steven M Paul.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.3597

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