Review Article | Published:

Induced regeneration—the progress and promise of direct reprogramming for heart repair

Nature Medicine volume 19, pages 829836 (2013) | Download Citation

Abstract

Regeneration of cardiac tissue has the potential to transform cardiovascular medicine. Recent advances in stem cell biology and direct reprogramming, or transdifferentiation, have produced powerful new tools to advance this goal. In this Review we examine key developments in the generation of new cardiomyocytes in vitro as well as the exciting progress that has been made toward in vivo reprogramming of cardiac tissue. We also address controversies and hurdles that challenge the field.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the American Heart Association Jon Holden DeHaan Cardiac Myogenesis Research Center, US National Institutes of Health grant NIH U01 HL100405 and the Spain Fund for Regenerative Medicine.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, the Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the Cardiovascular Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

    • Russell C Addis
    •  & Jonathan A Epstein

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Russell C Addis or Jonathan A Epstein.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.3225

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