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Memory in disguise

Nature Medicine volume 17, pages 11821183 (2011) | Download Citation

Memory T cells can be maintained for a lifetime, but the underlying mechanism has been hard to pin down. A new study identifies a subset of memory T cells with stem cell properties in humans and shows that these cells mediate a superior antitumor response in a mouse model of adoptive T cell therapy (pages 1290–1297).

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Federica Sallusto and Antonio Lanzavecchia are at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Bellinzona, Switzerland.

    • Federica Sallusto
    •  & Antonio Lanzavecchia

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  1. Search for Federica Sallusto in:

  2. Search for Antonio Lanzavecchia in:

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Federica Sallusto or Antonio Lanzavecchia.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2502

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