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The discovery of artemisinin (qinghaosu) and gifts from Chinese medicine

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Figure 1: A Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergencies by Ge Hong (284–346 CE).
Figure 2: Artemisia annua L.
Figure 3: Artemisinin.
Figure 4: Delegates at the fourth meeting of the Scientific Working Group on the Chemotherapy of Malaria in Beijing in 1981.

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Acknowledgements

I wish to express my heartfelt thanks to all my colleagues at the Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine for their devotion to our work and for their exceptional contributions to the discovery and application of artemisinin and its derivatives. I thank my colleagues in the Shangdong Provincial Institute of Chinese Medicine, the Yunnan Provincial Institute of Materia Medica, the Institute of Biophysics and the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine and the Academy of Military Medical Sciences for their significant contributions to Project 523. I also would pay my respects to the leadership at the national Project 523 office and their sound efforts in organizing the malaria project activities.

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Tu, Y. The discovery of artemisinin (qinghaosu) and gifts from Chinese medicine. Nat Med 17, 1217–1220 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2471

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