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TLR gateways to CD1 function

Nature Immunology volume 7, pages 811817 (2006) | Download Citation

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Abstract

CD1-restricted T cells can be activated by diverse lipids derived from mammals, bacteria and protozoa. Certain lipids function as antigens, which bind to CD1 proteins and contact T cell antigen receptors. Other lipids activate CD1-restricted T cells by functioning as adjuvants. By stimulating Toll-like receptors on antigen-presenting cells, these adjuvants alter cytokine secretion, lipid antigen synthesis and CD1 protein translation. Delineation of the separate mechanisms by which adjuvants and antigens activate CD1-restricted T cells is leading to new hypotheses about the functions of individual CD1 proteins during the transition from innate to acquired immune responses.

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Acknowledgements

I thank C. Roura-Mir, L. Wang, D. Young, K. Wucherpfennig, S. Behar, M. Brigl and V. Cerundolo for discussions and for providing data for figures. Supported by the Cancer Research Institute, the Pew Foundation Scholars in the Biomedical Sciences and the National Institutes of Health (AI071155, AR48632 and AI049313).

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  1. Division of Rheumatology, Immunology & Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. bmoody@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

    • D Branch Moody

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni1368

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