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Antibody regulation of B cell development

Abstract

Antibodies on the surface of B lymphocytes trigger adaptive immune responses and control a series of antigen-independent checkpoints during B cell development. These physiologic processes are regulated by a complex of membrane immunoglobulin and two signal transducing proteins known as Igα and Igβ. Here we focus on the role of antibodies in governing the maturation of B cells from early antigen-independent through the final antigen-dependent stages.

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Figure 1: B cell–differentiation scheme.

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Meffre, E., Casellas, R. & Nussenzweig, M. Antibody regulation of B cell development. Nat Immunol 1, 379–385 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1038/80816

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