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New developments in mast cell biology

Nature Immunology volume 9, pages 12151223 (2008) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Mast cells can function as effector and immunoregulatory cells in immunoglobulin E–associated allergic disorders, as well as in certain innate and adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on exciting new developments in the field of mast cell biology published in the past year. We highlight advances in the understanding of FcɛRI-mediated signaling and mast cell–activation events, as well as in the use of genetic models to study mast cell function in vivo. Finally, we discuss newly identified functions for mast cells or individual mast cell products, such as proteases and interleukin 10, in host defense, cardiovascular disease and tumor biology and in settings in which mast cells have anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive functions.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

    • Janet Kalesnikoff
    •  & Stephen J Galli
  2. Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

    • Stephen J Galli

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Competing interests

S.J.G. occasionally consults for Amgen, Genentech, Novartis and other companies that are developing or producing agents to treat allergies, asthma and/or other disorders linked to mast cells. S.J.G. is also on the scientific advisory board of Tunitas Therapeutics, which plans to develop products that can be used to treat allergies and asthma.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Janet Kalesnikoff or Stephen J Galli.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.f.216

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