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HIV reservoirs as obstacles and opportunities for an HIV cure

Nature Immunology volume 16, pages 584589 (2015) | Download Citation

Abstract

The persistence of HIV reservoirs remains a formidable obstacle to achieving sustained virologic remission in HIV-infected individuals after antiretroviral therapy (ART) is discontinued, even if plasma viremia has been successfully suppressed for prolonged periods of time. Numerous approaches aimed at eradicating the virus, as well as maintaining its prolonged suppression in the absence of ART, have had little success. A better understanding of the pathophysiologic nature of HIV reservoirs and the impact of various interventions on their persistence is essential for the development of successful therapeutic strategies against HIV or the long-term control of infection. Here, we discuss the persistent HIV reservoir as a barrier to cure as well as the current therapeutic strategies aimed at eliminating or controlling the virus in the absence of ART.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US National Institutes of Health.

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Affiliations

  1. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

    • Tae-Wook Chun
    • , Susan Moir
    •  & Anthony S Fauci

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Tae-Wook Chun.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.3152

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