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Neutrophils worm their way into macrophage long-term memory

Nature Immunology volume 15, pages 902904 (2014) | Download Citation

Neutrophil function is perhaps best studied in bacterial infection, during which they are directly involved in pathogen killing. After helminth invasion, however, neutrophils acquire an alternative transcriptional profile that allows them to 'train' macrophages to acquire long-term protective features.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. John R. Grainger is with the Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research and Faculty of Life Sciences of The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

    • John R Grainger
  2. Richard K. Grencis is with the Faculty of Life Sciences of The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

    • Richard K Grencis

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to John R Grainger or Richard K Grencis.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2990

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