Review Article | Published:

The skin-resident and migratory immune system in steady state and memory: innate lymphocytes, dendritic cells and T cells

Nature Immunology volume 14, pages 978985 (2013) | Download Citation

Abstract

The skin is a highly complex organ interspersed with a variety of smaller organ-like structures and a plethora of cell types that together perform essential functions such as physical sensing, temperature control, barrier maintenance and immunity. In this Review, we outline many of the innate and adaptive immune cell types associated with the skin, focusing on the steady state in mice and men, and include a broad update of dendritic cell function and T cell surveillance.

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Acknowledgements

We thank S. Mueller and A. Zaid for the immunohistology in Figure 2b,c. Supported by the Australian Research Council (W.R.H.) and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (W.R.H. and F.R.C.).

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  1. The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

    • William R Heath
    •  & Francis R Carbone

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to William R Heath or Francis R Carbone.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2680

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