Article | Published:

Condensin I associates with structural and gene regulatory regions in vertebrate chromosomes

Nature Communications volume 4, Article number: 2537 (2013) | Download Citation

Abstract

The condensin complex is essential for correct packaging and segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis in all eukaryotes. To date, the genome-wide location and the nature of condensin-binding sites have remained elusive in vertebrates. Here we report the genome-wide map of condensin I in chicken DT40 cells. Unexpectedly, we find that condensin I binds predominantly to promoter sequences in mitotic cells. We also find a striking enrichment at both centromeres and telomeres, highlighting the importance of the complex in chromosome segregation. Taken together, the results show that condensin I is largely absent from heterochromatic regions. This map of the condensin I binding sites on the chicken genome reveals that patterns of condensin distribution on chromosomes are conserved from prokaryotes, through yeasts to vertebrates. Thus in three kingdoms of life, condensin is enriched on promoters of actively transcribed genes and at loci important for chromosome segregation.

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Gene Expression Omnibus

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by an Australian Research Council discovery project (grant number DP110100784, National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) project grants (APP1047009) and by the Victorian Government’s Operational Infrastructure Support Program. W.C.E. is a Principal Research Fellow of the Wellcome Trust (grant number 073915). A.O. is a NHMRC Career Development Fellow. We thank K.H. Andy Choo, Jeffrey Mann, and Kathryn Marshall for helpful comments and discussion of the manuscript.

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The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia

    • Ji Hun Kim
    • , Tao Zhang
    • , Nicholas C. Wong
    • , Nadia Davidson
    • , Jovana Maksimovic
    • , Alicia Oshlack
    • , Paul Kalitsis
    •  & Damien F. Hudson
  2. Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia

    • Ji Hun Kim
    • , Tao Zhang
    • , Alicia Oshlack
    • , Paul Kalitsis
    •  & Damien F. Hudson
  3. Ludwig Institute of Cancer Research, Olivia Newton John Cancer and Wellness Centre, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Melbourne, Victoria 3084, Australia

    • Nicholas C. Wong
  4. Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia

    • Nicholas C. Wong
  5. Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Edinburgh, Michael Swann Building, King’s Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JR, UK

    • William C. Earnshaw

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Contributions

J.H.K., D.F.H., P.K. and T.Z. designed and performed experiments. W.C.E. and N.C.W. provided resources for sequencing and data analysis. J.H.K., N.D., J.M. and A.O. analysed sequencing data. J.H.K., D.F.H., P.K. and W.C.E. wrote the manuscript. D.F.H. and P.K. co-managed the project.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Damien F. Hudson.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms3537

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