Article

Switching and amplification in disordered lasing resonators

  • Nature Communications 4, Article number: 1740 (2013)
  • doi:10.1038/ncomms2777
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Abstract

Controlling the flow of energy in a random medium is a research frontier with a wide range of applications. As recently demonstrated, the effect of disorder on the transmission of optical beams may be partially compensated by wavefront shaping, but losing control over individual light paths. Here we demonstrate a novel physical effect whereby energy is spatially and spectrally transferred inside a disordered active medium by the coupling between individual lasing modes. We show that it is possible to transmit an optical resonance to a remote point by employing specific control over optical excitations, obtaining a random lasing system, which acts both as a switch and as an amplifier.

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Acknowledgements

The research leading to these results has received funding from the ERC under the EC’s Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) grant agreement number 201766, the EU FP7 NoE Nanophotonics4Enery grant number 248855, the Spanish MICINN CSD2007-0046 (Nanolight.es), the MAT2009-07841 (GLUSFA) and the Comunidad de Madrid S2009/MAT-1756 (PHAMA).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. ISC-CNR, UOS Sapienza, P. A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy

    • Marco Leonetti
    •  & Claudio Conti
  2. Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC) Calle Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3 Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, España

    • Marco Leonetti
    •  & Cefe Lopez
  3. Department of Physics, University Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma, Italy

    • Claudio Conti

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Contributions

M. L. designed and performed experiments, C. L. and C. C. participated in data interpretation and in writing the paper.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Marco Leonetti.

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