p53 mutations in cancer

Abstract

In the past fifteen years, it has become apparent that tumour-associated p53 mutations can provoke activities that are different to those resulting from simply loss of wild-type tumour-suppressing p53 function. Many of these mutant p53 proteins acquire oncogenic properties that enable them to promote invasion, metastasis, proliferation and cell survival. Here we highlight some of the emerging molecular mechanisms through which mutant p53 proteins can exert these oncogenic functions.

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Figure 1: Models of mechanisms through which mutant p53 functions.
Figure 2: Mutant p53 binds to numerous proteins to enhance or inhibit their function.
Figure 3: Mutant p53 inhibits the function of p63.
Figure 4: Modifications of mutant p53.

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Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Cancer Research UK and AICR for supporting our work. We also would like to apologise to all authors we have not been able to cite owing to space restrictions.

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Correspondence to Karen H. Vousden.

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Muller, P., Vousden, K. p53 mutations in cancer. Nat Cell Biol 15, 2–8 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb2641

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