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Heads or tails: can Wnt tell which one is up?

Nature Cell Biology volume 10, pages 122124 (2008) | Download Citation

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Planarian flatworms regenerate their heads and tails after amputation. It turns out that they use Wnt–β-catenin signalling to determine where the head and the tail should form.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Elly M. Tanaka is at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstrasse 108, D-01307 Dresden, Germany and the Center for Regenerative Therapies, Dresden. Gilbert Weidinger is at the Biotechnology Center of the Technical University Dresden, Tatzberg 47, D-01307 Dresden, Germany.  tanaka@mpi-cbg.de  gilbert.weidinger@biotec.tu-dresden.de

    • Elly M. Tanaka
    •  & Gilbert Weidinger

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ncb0208-122

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