• A Corrigendum to this article was published on 22 November 2017

This article has been updated

Abstract

The 4D Nucleome Network aims to develop and apply approaches to map the structure and dynamics of the human and mouse genomes in space and time with the goal of gaining deeper mechanistic insights into how the nucleus is organized and functions. The project will develop and benchmark experimental and computational approaches for measuring genome conformation and nuclear organization, and investigate how these contribute to gene regulation and other genome functions. Validated experimental technologies will be combined with biophysical approaches to generate quantitative models of spatial genome organization in different biological states, both in cell populations and in single cells.

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Change history

  • 22 November 2017

    Please see accompanying Corrigendum (http://doi.org/10.1038/nature24667). This Perspective should have contained the following Acknowledgements section: 'We would like to thank the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund, the Office of Strategic Coordination and the Office of the NIH Director for funding the 4D Nucleome Program, which has supported the work represented by this report (1U54DK107981, 1U54DK107965, 1U54DK107980, 1U54DK107977, 1U54DK107967, 1U54DK107979, 1U01EB021232, 1U01EB021240, 1U01EB021223, 1U01EB021239, 1U01EB021238, 1U01EB021230, 1U01EB021237, 1U01EB021247, 1U01EB021236, 1U01CA200059, 1U01CA200060, 1U01CA200147, 1U01DA040601, 1U01DA040709, 1U01DA040583, 1U01DA040612, 1U01DA040588, 1U01DA040582, 1U01HL129971, 1U01HL130007, 1U01HL130010, 1U01HL129958, 1U01HL129998).' This has not been corrected online.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Program in Systems Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA

    • Job Dekker
  2. Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801, USA

    • Andrew S. Belmont
  3. Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA

    • Mitchell Guttman
  4. Department of Bioengineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA

    • Victor O. Leshyk
    •  & Sheng Zhong
  5. Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA

    • John T. Lis
  6. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain and Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA

    • Stavros Lomvardas
  7. Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA

    • Leonid A. Mirny
  8. Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA

    • Clodagh C. O’Shea
  9. Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA

    • Peter J. Park
  10. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla California 92093, USA

    • Bing Ren
  11. Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA

    • Joan C. Ritland Politz
  12. Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA

    • Jay Shendure

Consortia

  1. the 4D Nucleome Network

    A list of participants and their affiliations appears in the Supplementary Information.

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Contributions

All authors contributed to writing the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Job Dekker.

Reviewer Information Nature thanks G. Almouzni, G. Cavalli and H. Stunnenberg for their contribution to the peer review of this work.

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    Supplementary Information

    This file contains the grouped membership list of the six initiatives.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature23884

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