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Stem cells: Subclone wars

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Pluripotent stem cells, which give rise to every cell type, can acquire cancer-causing genetic mutations when grown in vitro. This finding has implications for the use of pluripotent cells in basic research and in the clinic. See Letter p.229

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Stephen Chanock is in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

    • Stephen Chanock

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Correspondence to Stephen Chanock.

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