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Recent advances and emerging trends in plant hormone signalling

Nature volume 459, pages 10711078 (25 June 2009) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Plant growth and development is regulated by a structurally unrelated collection of small molecules called plant hormones. During the last 15 years the number of known plant hormones has grown from five to at least ten. Furthermore, many of the proteins involved in plant hormone signalling pathways have been identified, including receptors for many of the major hormones. Strikingly, the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway plays a central part in most hormone-signalling pathways. In addition, recent studies confirm that hormone signalling is integrated at several levels during plant growth and development.

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Acknowledgements

Work in M.E.’s laboratory was supported by grants from the NIH (GM43644), the NSF (IOS 0744800), and the DOE (DOE DE-FG02-02ER15312) to M.E.

Author Contributions A.S. and M.E. generated an outline together. A.S. prepared the first draft of the article and A.S. and M.E. worked together on all subsequent drafts.

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  1. Molecular Kinetics Inc., 6201 La Pas Trail, Suite 160, Indianapolis, Indiana 46268, USA

    • Aaron Santner
  2. University of California San Diego, Section of Cell and Developmental Biology, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA

    • Mark Estelle

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Correspondence to Mark Estelle.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nature08122

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