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Association between daily cigarette consumption and hypertension moderated by CYP2A6 genotypes in Chinese male current smokers

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess whether cytochrome P450 enzyme 2A6 (CYP2A6) genotypes moderate the association between smoking and hypertension. In this study, 954 Chinese male current smokers from a community-based chronic disease screening project in Guangzhou were interviewed with a structured questionnaire about socio-demographic status, smoking and other health-related behaviors. Blood was collected for DNA extraction and CYP2A6 genotyping. Hypertension was defined according to 2007 ESH-ESC Practice Guidelines. A multivariate logistic regression was performed to examine the interaction between smoking quantity and CYP2A6 genotypes on hypertension after adjusting for age, education level and other potential confounders. Multivariate analyses indicated that smoking more than 15 cigarettes per day significantly increased the risk of hypertension (odds ratio (OR)=1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.21–2.10) compared with smoking 1–15 cigarettes per day, and further suggested that smoking interacted with normal CYP2A6 metabolizer genotype to increase the risk of hypertension. Smokers consuming more than 15 cigarettes per day with normal CYP2A6 metabolizer genotypes had the highest risk of hypertension (OR=2.04, 95% CI=1.11–3.75) compared with those consuming 1–15 cigarettes per day with slower CYP2A6 metabolizer genotypes. These findings demonstrated that smoking quantity was positively associated with hypertension and that CYP2A6 genotypes may moderate this relationship.

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Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the Guangzhou Health Bureau (2005-Zda-001) and National Institute on Drug Abuse/National Institutes of Health grants (K08-014276 and R21-027331). RFT acknowledges the support of CRC, CIHR and CAMH.

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Correspondence to W-Q Chen.

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Competing interests

Dr RF Tyndale holds shares in Nicogen, a company focused on the development of novel smoking cessation treatments. No support was provided by Nicogen for this study and the manuscript was not reviewed by other members of the company. Dr RF Tyndale has also consulted for Novartis on tobacco cessation. All other authors declare no conflicts of interests.

Appendix

Appendix

Table A1

Table a1 The associations of CYP2A6 genotypes with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in 954 Chinese male current smokers

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Liu, T., Tyndale, R., David, S. et al. Association between daily cigarette consumption and hypertension moderated by CYP2A6 genotypes in Chinese male current smokers. J Hum Hypertens 27, 24–30 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2011.111

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2011.111

Keywords

  • cigarette smoking
  • CYP2A6
  • genetic polymorphisms
  • interaction

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