News & Views | Published:

Biomedicine

Human genes lost and their functions found

Nature volume 544, pages 171172 (13 April 2017) | Download Citation

Individuals who lack a functional copy of a gene — gene knockouts — can reveal the gene's role. Most knockout research has used model organisms, but now a comprehensive catalogue of human knockouts is in sight. See Letter p.235

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nature 544, 235–239 (2017).

  2. 2.

    et al. Nature 536, 285–291 (2016).

  3. 3.

    et al. Eur. J. Epidemiol. 24, 329–338 (2009).

  4. 4.

    et al. Science 352, 474–477 (2016).

  5. 5.

    et al. Nature Genet. 47, 448–452 (2015).

  6. 6.

    et al. Nature Genet. 47, 445–447 (2015).

  7. 7.

    The Lp-PLA2 Studies Collaboration. Lancet 375, 1536–1544 (2010).

  8. 8.

    The TG and HDL Working Group of the Exome Sequencing Project. N. Engl. J. Med. 371, 22–31 (2014).

  9. 9.

    , , & N. Engl. J. Med. 371, 32–41 (2014)

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Robert M. Plenge is in the Translational Medicine Department, Merck, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    • Robert M. Plenge

Authors

  1. Search for Robert M. Plenge in:

Competing interests

The author declares competing financial interests. See go.nature.com/2p1srjx for details.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Robert M. Plenge.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/544171a

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing