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Earth science

An extended yardstick for climate variability

Nature volume 534, pages 626628 (30 June 2016) | Download Citation

  • A Correction to this article was published on 13 July 2016

This article has been updated

Decoded and precisely dated information encrypted in stalagmites from a cave in China reveal past climatic changes and provide insight into the complex interactions in today's climate system. See Letter p.640

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Change history

  • 08 July 2016

    The stalagmites shown in Figure 1 were, in fact, stalactites — the image was upside down. This image has now been replaced.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Nele Meckler is in the Department of Earth Science and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, University of Bergen, 5007 Bergen, Norway.

    • Nele Meckler

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Correspondence to Nele Meckler.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/534626a

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