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Microbial signals to the brain control weight

Nature volume 534, pages 185187 (09 June 2016) | Download Citation

The bacteria that inhabit the rodent gut promote insulin secretion and food intake by activating the parasympathetic nervous system — a hitherto unknown mode of action for this multifaceted microbiota. See Article p.213

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Mirko Trajkovski and Claes B. Wollheim are in the Department of Cell Physiology and Metabolism, Centre Médical Universitaire, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.

    • Mirko Trajkovski
    •  & Claes B. Wollheim

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Mirko Trajkovski or Claes B. Wollheim.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/534185a

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