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Cell biology

High-tech yeast ageing

Nature volume 486, pages 3738 (07 June 2012) | Download Citation

A method commonly employed to study replicative ageing in yeast is laborious and slow. The use of miniaturized culture chambers opens the door for automated molecular analyses of individual cells during ageing.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Michael Polymenis is in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77845, USA.

    • Michael Polymenis
  2. Brian K. Kennedy is at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, California 94945, USA, and at the Aging Research Institute, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, China.

    • Brian K. Kennedy

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Michael Polymenis or Brian K. Kennedy.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/486037a

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